Apple

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Apple reveals iOS 7… Bring it on Android

Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled a completely redesigned iOS 7 operating system for the iPhone and iPad at his company’s annual software developer conference on Monday, including a long-rumored iTunes Radio music service.

“It is the biggest change to iOS since the introduction of the iPhone,” Cook said to a standing ovation from a crowd of Apple fans and developers.

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New Look

iOS 7 is a radical departure from every generation of iOS that came before. Designer Jony Ive’s influence is clear. All of the 3-D elements and natural textures that have given iOS its signature look over the years are gone. That means no wooden bookshelf in iBooks, no felt tabletop in Game Center, no leather-bound calendar and so on.

The new operating system has a much more modern look thanks to cleaner lines, more use of white space, modern fonts, and a different color palette. There’s no denying that it is a big departure, but Apple was sure to keep many of the platform’s elements the same, such as the home screen layout and icon shape.

Sliding Gestures

Apple added a new sliding gesture to a number of apps, including Safari, Messages and Email that make it easier to move between messages, in-boxes or open tabs. The gesture is activated by swiping to the right or left when viewing messages.

Further, Apple added a new control screen that is accessible via swiping up from the bottom of the screen. This control screen provides quick and easy access to the wireless radios, brightness settings, a flashlight and music controls. (Users of Google’s Android platform will likely find it familiar.)

Lock Screen Notifications

The lock screen has a new look and feel to match the rest of the operating system. More important than the appearance, however, is the new support for notifications. iOS 7 allows users to see more notifications directly on the lock screen as well as to take action on those notifications. Further, notifications will sync across devices, so if you mark something on an iPad or Mac computer, it will be marked read on the iPhone as well.

Multitasking

Apple has made significant improvements to the way multitasking functions within iOS. Chiefly, multitasking is now supported by all apps available to the operating system. Previously, only select apps could function in the background while users were off doing other things. In addition to expanded support, iOS 7 is smarter about multitasking. It uses a new set of parameters to define when it should and shouldn’t update calls in the background, all of which are meant to help maximize battery life while also making sure users have the most up-to-date information.

Car Integration

Apple showed off new integration between the iPhone and in-care infotainment systems. Beginning with 2014 model-year vehicles, iOS 7 will be able to fully connect with cars. Apple demonstrated how it would look to use iOS through a car’s screen to make phone calls, play music or navigate via maps. At least a dozen car makers pledged support for the feature, including Chevy, Jaguar, Mercedes, Tesla, Ferrari and others.

Siri

Siri will be able to do a lot more than before, thanks to new integration with Microsoft’s Bing search engine and Wikipedia. Siri is better at understanding natural language requests, and can interact with more applications on the iPhone or iPad. For example, users can request that Siri play back voicemails or read SMS messages. Siri also gets a new voice, both male and female, with support for both in French and German.

Safari

Apple’s mobile browser sees a wide number of changes, many of which reflect changes being made in Apple’s OS X Mavericks desktop operating system. The browser is much faster at rendering Java, and has a new look that lets people see more of the content on Web pages. It supports better keychain access for storing passwords and credit card information across devices, as well as better parental controls for managing content. Last, it has a new user interface for interacting with multiple tabs. It supports more than eight open tabs at a time, and lets users reorder and close tabs with the flick of a finger.

Music and iTunes Radio

Apple updated not only the iTunes store, but the general appearance of the music player with iOS 7. It has a cleaner, simpler look, but still offers plenty of features. Perhaps the biggest new feature is support for iTunes Radio, a new streaming service that will allow iOS device owners to create and listen to radio stations based on artists, songs and so on. iTunes Radio is ad free to subscribers of iTunes Match, but shows ads for those who don’t. Apple has created hundreds of its own radio stations, but also lets users share their own.

iOS 7 will be made available to registered iOS developers later Monday. The full operating system won’t be available to consumers until the fall, probably closer to when Apple launches the next version of the iPhone. Apple typically offers a new iOS beta every few weeks leading up to the final release.


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Happening Now… Apple Event – iPhone 5S revealed!!

OK.. the news are true. iPhone 5S is finally announced.

iPhone 5S is coming in three colours, CPU is twice faster than A6 which is in iPhone 5 and it runs 64bit applications with backward compatibility with 32bit applications.

More details will be posted later.

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Happening Now… Apple Event – iPhone 5C revealed!!

Currently the Apple event is still going on and so far they have revealed some of their new products which we will be posting about gradually.

The new member in Apple’s family is the iPhone 5C which will be similar to iPhone 5 in hardware capabilities but with more colourful design.

 

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Apple’s iCloud services including iMessage is returned to normal after short outage.

Steve Jobs Introduces iCloud Storage System At Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference

Apple’s iCloud is encountered some issues today’s morning. Users said that they’re having difficulty accessing iMessage, the Apps Store, the Game Center, and possibly more. The company’s system status webpagehas confirmed this saying that they are investigating and will update as it has more to report. This outage is the second one affecting the system this week.

With over 190 million usersand continued growth in the future, any downtime can affect a lot of people. This problem is affecting people across all of Apple’s iOS devices, including the iPad, iPhone, and even computers since iCloud is used on all its platforms. Apple first noticed and logged this issue on its site at 2:15pm PST today.

Currently, Apple’s system status confirms that iCloud, FaceTime, iMessage, and the Game Center were affected by this outage.

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The iOS 6 Features everybody’s keeping quite about!!!

iOS 6, your cup runneth over. The new future brain of your iPhone and iPad is lovelier than ever.

A new Share screen

In iOS 5, when you tap to share a photo, you get a long list of sharing actions to choose from—whether it’s posting to Twitter, sending an email or iMessage, or some other option. iOS 6 adds Facebook sharing as an option, along with sharing to various Chinese social networks. But Apple decided against cramming more buttons into that panel.

Instead, iOS 6 presents you with a new, icon-based sharing screen. It uses icons to represent the apps and services that you can share your content with and looks quite a bit like the iPhone’s home screen.

New Siri functionality

Flagship features added to Siri include the voice-driven personal assistant’s arrival on the third-generation iPad. Siri also gains the ability to answer questions about sports and movies in iOS 6, and it will be integrated with turn-by-turn directions in Maps. But the virtual assistant gains several other new features as well that might have escaped your attention.

In iOS 6, you’ll be able to compose new tweets and Facebook status updates with Siri—and both capabilities appear to be implemented smartly: If you link your friends’ Twitter usernames to their Contacts entries, Siri automatically translates their real names as you dictate. That is, if I say, “Tweet ‘Excellent dinner last night with Shahim Khan, Shahid Shaikh, and Maged Ragaei,’” Siri will automatically compose a tweet like “Excellent dinner last night with @skhan, @sshaikh, and @maged.”

On the new iPad, Siri can answer questions about weather and stocks, even though Apple hasn’t (yet) ported its Weather and Stocks apps to the iPad. Apple did show a glimpse of a new default Clock app for the iPad, so we won’t be shocked if Stocks and Weather finally make the leap to the big screen before iOS 6’s official release, too.

Spotlight tweak

If you have lots of apps, sometimes it’s hard to figure out precisely which homescreen they’re located on. In iOS 6, Spotlight makes that at least a smidgen easier, by listing the name of the folder a particular app is nestled inside when it appears in the search results.

Reminders improvements

Apple introduced the Reminders app in iOS 5, and it looks to score some helpful updates in iOS 6. Apple says that you’ll be able to set location-based reminders from the iPad. Even better, you’ll be able to tap in addresses where you’d like to be reminded manually, a feature currently missing from Reminders; at present, you can only set reminders for locations linked to addresses for your existing contacts.

Also new in Reminders will be the ability to reorder your tasks as desired. And Apple told developers that iOS 6 includes a new Reminders API, which should make it possible for third-party apps to integrate with the Reminders database. That means that you could use Siri to set Reminders which would in turn be visible in your third-party task management app of choice.

Call rejection

Sometimes, you can’t take a call when your iPhone starts ringing. You can already quickly send a call to voicemail by tapping the Ignore button, but iOS 6 adds more powerful options for when you’re too busy to answer. When your phone rings, you’ll see a button on the screen akin to the new camera shortcut on the lock screen in iOS 5.1—a switch that you slide up to trigger.

When you do so, you’ll see options to send the caller a message, or to remind yourself to call the person back later. If you choose to send a message, iOS offers several default options; you can also save custom responses. Your iPhone will then attempt to iMessage or SMS the caller with your note, while also sending them straight to your voicemail.

Other features

Near the end of the iOS portion of the keynote, Apple showed a slide listing a host of other features included in the iOS 6 update. Among those were Game Center challenges, the ability to connect Game Center friends from Facebook, VoiceOver improvements, personal dictionary in iCloud (for adding your own terms to the dictionary, which can sync between devices), and per-account signatures in Mail. Also on the list was improved privacy, which—as a new option in Settings—will let you control which apps can access which bits of personal data, like your Contacts, Calendar, or Photos. Other features on the list included autocorrection for every keyboard, Bluetooth MAP support (which is commonly used to help cars better offer hands-free communication with Bluetooth devices), kernel ASLR (which aims to make data even more impervious to snooping from malicious attackers), custom vibrations for alerts, redesigned stores (for the App and iTunes stores), IPv6 support for Wi-Fi and LTE, word highlights for speak selection, improved keyboard layouts, alarms with songs, and faster JavaScript in Safari. Apple also says iOS 6 includes a global HTTP proxy option, which would supplant the current approach, limited as it is to per-connection proxy settings.

Other features for developers include audio and video sampling during playback, Pass Kit (for interacting with Passbook), VoiceOver gestures, the ability to control camera focus and exposure, a Web Audio API, Game Center in-app experience, game groups, video stabilization, frame drop data, pull-to-refresh on Table views, a means of supporting in-app purchases of iTunes Store-hosted content, in-app Bluetooth pairing, remote Web Inspector, rich text on label fields and text views, CSS filters, crossfade with CSS animations, and a face detection API.

But what about the unsung stuff? Here are the coolest quiet additions.

Wake up to a song

Marimba gets a little stale. Now you can select any song on your iPhone as an alarm from within the Clock app. Ride of the Valkyries works well, as does anything by Waka Flocka. Beach House and Fiona Apple aren’t quite as conducive to getting your ass out of bed. There have been apps offering this for years, but now it’s built in, and built in is better.

Power privacy

This one’s simple: there’s now a list in settings of all the apps that have requested access to your location, contacts, calendars, reminders, and photos. Turn on or off access as you see fit.

Your (weird) words saved in the cloud

If you repeatedly use a word that’s not in Apple’s standard dictionary—like “basketball face,” or calling your girlfriend “squeezybooty,” your phone will stop trying to correct you and just add it to the list of real words. Now this list of all your slang, inside jokes, and abbreviations, will be stored on iCloud forever, across devices.

A modern iPod

The Music app ditched its old skin for a darker, simpler, monochromatic getup. It functions the exact same, but steps closer to OS X in appearance. Maybe you’ll like it more than the old look—if not, you’ll quickly forget what the old look looked like, anyway.

Bonus: Remodeled iTunes/App Stores

Talk about stale! The stores on your phone were never easy to get around: too many lists, too many sections, too much scrolling. In iOS 6 they get a chic makeover, highly reminiscent of the glamorous Apple TV storefront. The new stores also add clever horizontal scrolling through lists and categories, which is less of a pain and allows for a more digestible spread of information on a non-television screen. Featured albums, apps, videos, and the like are all sorted together with big eye-easy graphics. It won’t cost you any less, but you’ll spend less sanity on your downloads.

Tons of new emoji

All emoji are good emoji. And the old iOS 5 set was pretty great. But just look at the artistry and detail in each of these teeny tiny animals. Notice the chicken’s softly shaded feathers. The poodle’s regal pose. That blow fish! Now return to your old iOS 5 emoji animals—they basically resemble balloon animal heads with beaks.

App update history

As part of its total overhaul to the App Store, The Big A is introducing a complete history of updates for every app, so you can see, for example, precisely when the Orange Bird was added to Angry Birds Seasons.

New app banners

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Your iOS Home screen now wraps a dashing “New” sash over recently downloaded apps, reminding forgetful features editors to actually, you know, play their newly purchased games.

Pull to refresh in mail

A tiny bit of UI magic, made popular by Twitter apps. To refresh your inbox, just drag the list down and then ping it back. Developers can borrow the feature for their apps.

IPv6 support

The IP address tap has almost completely run dry, so the web is anxiously moving to IPv6 – a system with 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses to share. iOS 6 adds support for these new 128-bit locators.

Custom signatures

You can now set a separate email signature for each account on your device. Plus, use bold, italic, and underline to really emphasise that this email was sent from your iPhone.

Retina shutdown spinner

Okay, one more. A bonus, for the most pedantic of the pedants. For the most eagle-eyed observer. The little spinning icon that appears when you shut down your device is finally Retina enabled. Best. Feature. Ever.

New Clock app

The iPad now has a new Clock app of its own.


Apple officially gives Google Maps the boot, launches own Maps app with turn-by-turn navigation

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It’s been one the big questions hanging over WWDC — will Apple actually toss Google to the side and launch it’s own mapping service specifically for iOS? Well, it’s not a question any more, but a cold hard fact. Apple’s mapping solution is here, taking over where Google left off. The move is hardly shocking since Apple has already confirmed that it’s been working on a traffic database and snatched up a number of mapping companies. Besides, it’s not like Cupertino and Mountain View are the best of buds right now. Maps includes all of the features you’ve come to expect from the previous iOS solution, but with a number of enhancements. This all new mapping solution includes 100 million different business listings, Yelp integration and, biggest of all, turn-by-turn navigation. The app does use anonymously collected data to populate traffic information and any rerouting is brought to your attention with a pop-up notification.

The story isn’t done yet, though. The maps are even rendered in full 3D, not unlike what Google announced last week. (And the news was delivered in a way that made it clear Apple think’s they’ve one upped their former map app provider.) The whole demo — flipping through business listings, flying around in 3D and navigating labyrinth-like city streets — was performed on one of those shiny new iPads… you know, the ones that are getting Siri support soon. Which, if you haven’t figured out yet, plays quite nicely with the new Maps app as we saw in the demo. Ask Siri to find a gas station on your route or how much longer you’ll be on the road and the pleasantly robotic voice gets you the relevant info.


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Apple unveils iOS 6 at WWDC, launch apps with Siri, Facebook integration, Maps

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Looks like they didn’t print the banner out for nothing — as anticipated, it’s not just refreshed MacBook Airs or Mountain Lion getting the red carpet treatment at today’s World Wide Developer’s Conferencekeynote. Cupertino has also taken the shiny cling wrap off of the latest version of iOS. What’s new? Well at least 200 things! Most notably, Siri has gotten a little make over, including the ability to launch apps, more knowledge of sports, restaurants and movie times, it’s also coming to iPad. There’s better Facebook integration too, with photos, websites, maps and more getting the instant share option — you can even “like” or share app from the Appstore. Other tweaks on the phone side of things let you dismiss incoming calls with a swipe, or send a pre-written SMS, even set it to give you a reminder once you change location.

Another popular feature will include “Do Not Disturb” to hold off all those notifications (from your new Facebook friends, we guess). You’ll still get them, but the won’t alert, or light up the screen. Face-timers will also be pleased to see that feature finally working over cellular. Sharing images also just got easier with shared Photo Streams — choose the pictures, choose the friends. Done. New “Guided Access” allows parents or teachers (for example) to keep users from exiting an app accidentally (or in the case of the teachers — intentionally!).


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Apple announces refreshed MacBook Air: Ivy Bridge processor, USB 3.0, shipping today

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Apple’s skinnier, lighter MacBook option checked in for another (irregular) hardware update at this year’sWWDC. Just under a year since the last time the range was renovated, the move to Ivy Bridge processors wasn’t the only thing that changed. First up, those processors will reach up to 2GHz Core i7, with Turbo Boost tipping these up to 3.2GHz. The FaceTime camera is now 720p, with the display on the 11-inch model staying put at 1366 x 768 (but with Intel’s HD graphics 4000 doing the pushing). The 13-incher will house a 1440 x 900 screen and both will arrive with a pair of USB 3.0 ports and capacity for up to 8GB of RAM. Storage will now extend to 512GB, while prices will start at $999 for the most basic option, up to $1099 for the speediest offering. The best part? They’ll start shipping today.


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Apple announces next-generation MacBook Pro: Retina display, 0.71-inches thin, shipping today for $2,199

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Apple announced some new MacBook Airs and MacBook Pros early in its WWDC keynote today, but it had another surprise in store for its big hardware announcement: the next-generation MacBook Pro. It packs a Retina display with a 2880 x 1800 resolution (or 220ppi), and a casing that measures just 0.71-inch thin and weighs 4.46 pounds. In addition to that high resolution, Apple is also promising higher contrast ratios, better viewing angles and reduced glare compared to other laptop displays, and it’s updated all of its stock apps to take advantage of those extra pixels, not to mention Aperture and Final Cut Pro — “reading your mail is like reading fine print,” according to Apple’s Phil Schiller. As for the other specs, you’ll get to 16GB of RAM, NVIDIA Kepler GT 650M graphics, up to a quad-core 2.7GHz Core i7 processor, a maximum 768GB of storage (SSD, naturally), and a promised seven hours of battery life with 30 days standby. One spec nowhere to be seen: an optical drive. Also on the outs are Ethernet and FireWire 800 ports, which you’ll now need an optional Thunderbolt adapter to use.

Making its debut on the laptop is a new, thinner MagSafe connector, as well as a new fan that’s said to be “nearly imperceptible” to the user. Pricing starts at $2,199 for a 2.3GHz unit with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, and it’s shipping today. “It’s without doubt the very best computer that we’ve ever built,” says Schiller.


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iOS 6 is live now!

Yes it’s out and the downloads are spreaded all over the world. What you are waiting for? Go and get your iDevice updated now.

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